assangistan:

MUST See:

12 Young Latina Artists Changing The Contemporary Art Landscape

By Priscilla Frank via huffingtonpost

From top to bottom: Annette Martinez, Linda Lucía Santana, Cristy C. Road

When family tales are passed from generation to generation with no single point of origin, when history fails to document years of pain and struggle, when personal identity becomes too complex to describe in a single sitting, when memory and imagination mingle in the land of dreams, this is where art comes in very handy.

For young Latina artists, art is an invaluable tool to archive the past, understand the present and activate change in the future. Yet, as with many underrepresented populations, Latina artists and the work they produce are often silenced and overlooked. An exhibition entitled "Y, Qué? (And What!)" is here to change that.

Composed entirely of Latin artists under the age of 35, “Y, Qué?” presents a diverse array of multimedia artworks through which to navigate the past, archive the intangible, occupy multiple spaces and personas and unabashedly declare one’s existence. Exploring themes of race, class, gender, sexuality and cultural identity, the selected emerging artists don’t just tell us their stories, they show us.

"Y, Qué?" is the 19th edition of the "Young Latino Artists Exhibition," a highly anticipated exhibition series at the Mexic-Arte Museum in Austin, Texas. Guest curated by Más Rudas Chicana Collective, this year’s stunning exhibition showcases the bold future of female artists and the unrelenting power of art to make sense of the world around us. Behold, 12 young Latina artists changing the landscape of contemporary art.

(Source: The Huffington Post)

sadiie:

Firelei Baez  - Not Even Unalterable Limitations

sadiie:

Firelei Baez  - Not Even Unalterable Limitations

nokiabae:

Les Femmes du Maroc Lalla Essaydi

Moroccan artist Lalla Essaydi made the series ‘Les Femmes du Maroc’ (The women of Marocco). She elaborates on the complex role of Moroccan women in a Muslim society. “In my art,” Essaydi says, “I wish to present myself through multiple lenses — as artist, as Moroccan, as Saudi, as traditionalist, as Liberal, as Muslim. In short, I invite the viewer to resist stereotypes.”

lisapollman:

Sama Alshaibi (b. Iraq)
Gitmo Girl
2009, Digital Archival Print on Cranes Silver Rag, 51 x 76.5 cm. Edition of 7. Image courtesy Ayyam Gallery. 

lisapollman:

Sama Alshaibi (b. Iraq)

Gitmo Girl

2009, Digital Archival Print on Cranes Silver Rag, 51 x 76.5 cm. Edition of 7. Image courtesy Ayyam Gallery. 

aprill-showers:

In documenting the daily changes to my hair, a natural hygrometer, this ongoing piece brings up two absurd tests used for racial stratification, the ‘brown paperbag’ and ‘fan’ tests, of the American South and the Dominican Republic, which informed social interactions during my upbringing in these sites.
- Firelei Baez

aprill-showers:

In documenting the daily changes to my hair, a natural hygrometer, this ongoing piece brings up two absurd tests used for racial stratification, the ‘brown paperbag’ and ‘fan’ tests, of the American South and the Dominican Republic, which informed social interactions during my upbringing in these sites.

- Firelei Baez


Breathtaking Photos Of Witch Doctors And Healers Reveal The Spiritual Diversity Of Bolivia

Artists Thomas Rousset and Raphaël Verona traveled across the Altiplano region of Bolivia for a very specific reason.
They wanted to photograph the astounding spiritual diversity of the landlocked South American expanses, capturing portraits of the healers, witch doctors and medicine men who keep traditional mystic culture alive. Living in a beautiful space between the country’s storied religious past and its rapidly advancing present, these figures represent magical realism in the 21st century.

They definitely have the “look” of “outsider,” but I’m intrigued nevertheless.

Breathtaking Photos Of Witch Doctors And Healers Reveal The Spiritual Diversity Of Bolivia

Artists Thomas Rousset and Raphaël Verona traveled across the Altiplano region of Bolivia for a very specific reason.

They wanted to photograph the astounding spiritual diversity of the landlocked South American expanses, capturing portraits of the healers, witch doctors and medicine men who keep traditional mystic culture alive. Living in a beautiful space between the country’s storied religious past and its rapidly advancing present, these figures represent magical realism in the 21st century.

They definitely have the “look” of “outsider,” but I’m intrigued nevertheless.

independentcreativeservices:

image

The following is a summary & analysis of Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review article, “Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching” by Richard Delgado.

SUMMARY

Delgado attempts to shed light on a largely unknown history of Latinos, particularly Mexican-Americans in the…

artlog:

Rubber Sentinels of Broadway 

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AMAAAAZING! I’m so there!

harlemcollective:

harlemcollective:

Harlemite, original member of the Harlem Writer’s Guild and phenomenal woman Dr. Maya Angelou.

Queen. Giant. Boss. Spiritual Mother. Phenomenally Black Woman. 

harlemcollective:

harlemcollective:

Harlemite, original member of the Harlem Writer’s Guild and phenomenal woman Dr. Maya Angelou.

Queen. Giant. Boss. Spiritual Mother. Phenomenally Black Woman. 


How Deisy Toussaint Got Her Nationality Back
This young writer never intended to take on the government. But when the battle came to her door, she became a leading spokesperson for Haitian Migrant rights.

How Deisy Toussaint Got Her Nationality Back

This young writer never intended to take on the government. But when the battle came to her door, she became a leading spokesperson for Haitian Migrant rights.